Rapper Rick Ross performs at BET's Rip The Runway 2013:Show at Hammerstein Ballroom on February 27, 2013 in New York City. (Photo by Theo Wargo/Getty Images for BET's Rip The Runway)

Rick Ross has recently been under fire for “You Ain’t Even Know It” lyrics that many believe reference date rape.

Now, despite an apology issued by the rapper via Twitter on Thursday, one activist organization believes the rapper’s words do not make full amends, and is urging he endure more serious repercussions.

Following the release of his tweet, the women’s rights group UltraViolet rallied outside the Reebok flagship store in New York City to demand the sneaker company drop Ross as spokesperson.

“It’s time for Reebok to stop using their brand as a platform to dictate to women what counts as rape. Contrary to Ross’ claims, there was no misinterpretation here: Slipping a woman a drug and ‘enjoying that’ is rape, plain and simple,” says a statement on the company’s website by co-founder Nita Chaudhary. “It’s time for them to answer the 72,000 former customers who want them to stop promoting violence against women and fire Rick Ross.”

Guilt by association

The organization has released a petition and collected more than 70,000 signatures from supporters who believe Ross should be dropped from Reebok.

“It’s unacceptable that Reebok, one of the oldest brands in athletics, would stand behind someone who so openly condones rape. Companies like Reebok have a responsibility to the public,” says another statement issued on a press release by Sonia Ossorio, President of NOW NYC – an organization supportive of UltraViolet’s mission.

“Propping up someone who rants about rape and paying that person millions of dollars is about as irresponsible as it gets. The Reebok board of directors should take immediate action,” she added.

Apologies fall flat

The rapper himself tweeted: “I dont condone rape. Apologies for the #lyric interpreted as rape. #BOSS.”

This was followed by another tweet specifically targeted to Reebok and UltraViolet, which read: “Apologies to my many business partners, who would never promote violence against women.”

The controversial lyric has Ross alluding to taking advantage to a woman who’s been drugged: “Put molly all in her champagne, she ain’t even know it. I took her home and I enjoyed that, she ain’t even know it.”

The rapper also recently appeared at a New Orleans radio station where he addressed the lyrics and claimed it all to be a “misunderstanding,” which then prompted rapper Talib Kweli to speak out on the matter, claiming that Ross’ apology was “unacceptable.”

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