Organic nail salons are growing in popularity. That’s because the chemicals used in most salons can be toxic over time.

Clients of the Rosewood Crescent Spa in Dallas expect the very best, and the staff there says they deliver.

Of course there’s no bad nail salon smell there. Spa director Jennifer Haack says the products they use for manicures and pedicures are non-toxic.

“You can feel good about the fact that you’re using something that’s been developed in a really healthy environment, designed to be healthier for your skin and body…free of certain chemicals that have been proven to have long term negative effects on the body,” Haack says.

Nail salons that claim to be organic or eco-friendly are popping all over the country, and not just at luxury hotel spas.

Salon owner Missy Malone is renovating her Fort Worth building for her Spa-Taneity concept. “We actually have disposable foot baths. You can actually lift this out and dispose of it.”

Malone says she will also offer eco-friendly services such as waterless manicures and pedicures. She says like other women, she’s more concerned than sanitation during nail services.

Nail salons can be toxic spaces: there’s the dust, and many traditional products that contain the “toxic trio.”

The toxic trio consists of Formaldehyde, a known carcinogen used as a preservative, Toluene, a solvent found in nail glues which can cause headaches; dizziness and nausea, And D-B-P reduces polish cracking, but can cause birth defects and miscarriages.

There are more choices now when it comes to chemical free polish, but when it comes to choosing an eco-friendly salon for yourself it’s buyer beware: anyone can say they are organic or eco-friendly.

“I think the technicians you work with should be able to talk to you about your products. And the spas that you choose to go to should be able to explain why those products really are organic or eco-friendly,” Haack says.

And if in doubt, check out the ingredients list for yourself.