An Egyptian protester kicks a live tear gas canister into a fire during clashes with riot police near Tahrir Square on January 27, 2013 in Cairo, Egypt. Violent protests continued across Egypt two days after the second anniversary of the Egyptian Revolution that overthrew former President Hosni Mubarak on January 25, and one day after the announcement of the death penalty for 21 suspects in connection with a football stadium massacre one year before. The verdict was announced in a case over the deaths of more than seventy fans of Egypt's Al-Ahly football club in a stadium massacre on February 1, 2012, in the northern city of Port Said, during a brawl that began minutes after the final whistle of a match between Al-Ahly and opposing side, Al-Masry. 21 fans of the opposing side, Al-Masry, were given the death penalty, a verdict that must now be approved by Egypt's Grand Mufti. (Photo by Ed Giles/Getty Images).

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House says it “strongly condemns” the wave of violence in Egypt and says Egyptian leaders should make clear that violence is not acceptable.

White House press secretary Jay Carney says President Barack Obama‘s administration welcomes “serious calls for national dialogue.”

Islamist President Mohammed Morsi has tried to contain the crisis by imposing a state of emergency in three Egyptian provinces.

The Egyptian military has deployed troops in two cities hit by the violence. The main opposition in the country says that Morsi and Islamists have tried to impose a monopoly on power.

At least 56 people have been killed in clashes between protesters and riot police.

Carney said Egypt needs to find a lasting solution that “adheres to the rights of all Egyptians.”

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.