Charlamagne, DJ Envy get dragged over ignorant Amara La Negra interview

The 'Breakfast Club' co-hosts embarrassingly downplay singer's colorism struggles as an Afro-Latina.

Amara La Nega theGrio.com

The Breakfast Club’s Charlamagne Tha God and DJ Envy are being dragged yet again on Twitter over a controversial interview with Amara La Negra, in which they diminished her struggles with colorism as an Afro-Latina.

During the exchange, the breakout Love & Hip-Hop: Miami star touched on her identity as a Afro-Latina, explaining the difficulties she’s faced in trying to be accepted in the entertainment business as a dark-skinned Latina.

“They’ll always pick the lighter–the ones who look like J.Lo–before they look at us. Who cares if you’re talented? Who’s cares if you’re educated? You’re always going to be the last option,” Amara explained.

The singer also shared that she was once turned down by a Latin soap opera over her skin color, and told that she would be considered if the show explored roles for a prostitute, gangster or a slave.

‘You sure it’s not in your mind?’

But rather than listening and understanding Amara’s unique experience as an Afro-Latina, many felt Charlamagne and Envy were condescending and ignorant.

Pointing to success stories like Cardi B, who is also Latina, Charlamagne argued that there is a market for Latinas in the music industry. However, he failed to acknowledge Cardi’s light-skinned privilege.

“You sure it’s not in your mind?” Charlamagne asked. “What is Cardi B? How do you explain her? Cardi’s teeth was messed up, she came from the strip club, she’s so-called ratchet and ghetto as hell. Now she’s America’s darling.”

DJ Envy also tried to discredit Amara’s arguments about colorism in the Afro-Latina community, questioning its legitimacy because he doesn’t “see it” in neighborhoods he’s in. At one point, DJ Envy even asks Amara if she thinks Cardi is lighter than her, when it’s obvious that she is.

Still Amara La Nega held her own. “It’s not that hard to be confused,” Amara shot back.

“We need to give opportunities to people who look like myself. To really be judged off their talent and knowledge–not based on [looks]. I shouldn’t feel obligated to change the way that I look to please anybody else or fit the standards of what beauty should be.”

Take a look at the entire interview and see some Twitter reactions below.