Singer/songwriter Halsey has helped set off an ongoing firestorm on Twitter after pronouncing her growing lack of patience with hotels that offer “white people shampoo” and other hair products suitable for primarily white hair.

It started with a tweet she issued Thursday night. “I’ve been traveling for years now and it’s been so frustrating that the hotel toiletry industry entirely alienates people of color. I can’t use this perfumed watered down white people shampoo. Neither can 50% of ur customers. Annoying,” the April 26 tweet read, according to Refinery29.

The tweet was no longer visible on Halsey’s Twitter feed on Saturday, but the responses and exchanges were there. Halsey, 23, whose given name is Ashley Nicolette Frangipane, based her stage name on the Brooklyn street and subway station bearing the same name. She is a native of New Jersey and escalated to fame when she began posting videos to YouTube.

Halsey’s white followers were not pleased at her audacity to express an opinion they did not like.

@younggodhood tweeted to her, “you are one of the white people sweetie.”

Halsey tweeted back, “No. I am not.”

@Sweetnihilist tweeted back to her, “So bring your own shampoo.”

@nicjulestad10 tweeted to her that she was “dumb for this one.”

Halsey shot them down.

“Who knew me acknowledging that white hair care products are the national standard (while POC are confined to a tiny aisle) would piss so many people off,” she tweeted midway through the tweet storm. “Not sorry.”

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To individual critics, she tweeted, “How can u have lived ur entire life without knowing that people of color and white people require different hair care products?” and, “The point is that mass production of those products as the standard is part of a greater problem of disenfranchisement. If white ppl can enjoy the luxury/convenience, there should be an option for everyone.”

Halsey has a white mother and a black father but has said she identifies primarily as a black woman and has described herself as such.

“I look like a white girl, but I don’t feel like one,” she told Playboy last year. “I’m a black woman.”

She added, “It’s been weird navigating that. When I was growing up I didn’t know if I was supposed to love TLC or Britney.”