Colin Kaepernick’s $110 Air Force 1 sneakers sell out quickly

They were released Monday on Nike’s website and app.

Colin Kaepernick looks to make a pass during a private NFL workout in Riverdale, Ga. . (Photo by Carmen Mandato/Getty Images)

Colin Kaepernick’s new Air Force 1 sneakers sold out on Nike’s website and app on Monday, the same day the sneakers were released in North America, reports say.

Some stores may still have some pairs of the $110 sneakers, although they are sold out online, according to CNN.

READ MORE: Colin Kaepernick’s highly anticipated Nike sneaker comes out in December

The Air Force 1 x Colin Kaepernick leather sneaker is low-top, black and white and features the letter “K” on the tongue and a headshot of Kap on the back tab. The sneaker also features the date “08 14 16” on the right sole, the first time Kap refused to stand during the national anthem at a preseason game to protest racial injustice and police brutality. Instead, he remained on the bench during the duration of the song. He began kneeling on Sept. 1, 2016, sparking a movement.

Kap, 32, premiered the new kicks last month during his football tryouts near Atlanta. And last year, he signed an endorsement deal with Nike and became the face of an ad campaign for his civil rights and social justice activism, even though he hasn’t played in the NFL for three years.

“Nike partnered with a collective of collaborators to design an AF1 that connects to their life personally,” a Nike spokesperson explained to CNN. “Colin was identified because we believe his voice and perspective inspire many generations on and off the field.”

READ MORE: Colin Kaepernick spoke at ‘Un-Thanksgiving’ Day event in honor of Native Americans

Nike’s collaboration with Kaepernick was ripped by Donald Trump and many conservatives who threatened to boycott the sneaker giant. However, Nike ultimately increased its sales as a result of the endorsement, according to Forbes.

So far, Kap has done a hit commercial for Nike where he utters: “Believe in something, even if it means sacrificing everything.” That ad campaign would go on to win an Emmy. Kap is also credited with stopping Nike from releasing the “Betsy Ross” American flag shoe out of concern that the sneaker appeared to glorify the timeframe before slavery ended.

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