Iran deal a test of Obama’s unique foreign policy approach

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President Barack Obama waves to the photographers as he departs the White House November 24, 2013 in Washington, DC. The President will visit Seattle, San Francisco, and Los Angeles before returning Tuesday night. Obama warned, 'we will turn off the relief, and ratchet up the pressure' if Iran doesn't meet commitments' after an interim agreement on Iranian nuclear power was reached yesterday in negotiations between Iran and six world powers that will freeze Iran's nuclear program and provide some relief in sanctions. A major sticking point in the negotiations has been Iran's insistence on its right to enrich uranium. (Photo by Ron Sachs-Pool/Getty Images)

President Barack Obama waves to the photographers as he departs the White House November 24, 2013 in Washington, DC. The President will visit Seattle, San Francisco, and Los Angeles before returning Tuesday night. Obama warned, 'we will turn off the relief, and ratchet up the pressure' if Iran doesn't meet commitments' after an interim agreement on Iranian nuclear power was reached yesterday in negotiations between Iran and six world powers that will freeze Iran's nuclear program and provide some relief in sanctions. A major sticking point in the negotiations has been Iran's insistence on its right to enrich uranium. (Photo by Ron Sachs-Pool/Getty Images)

More than a decade ago, George W. Bush cast Iran as part of the “axis of evil.”

During the 2008 campaign, Hillary Clinton blasted as “naive” the idea that a U.S. president should talk directly with the leaders of rogue countries like Iran.