Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner’s neighbors in their ritzy DC neighborhood, held a silent protest outside of their multi-million dollar home in protest of Donald Trump’s strict immigration policies that has separated migrant children from their parents.

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On Wednesday, the protestors stood in silent solidarity outside of the power couple’s $5.5 million family home, in the Kalorama neighborhood, with candles lit and holding signs with reunification messages, reports the Daily Mail.

“Love thy neighbor,” read one sign. “Tell Daddy, enough!” and “Reunited,” read others.

Riley Temple, 69, who lives just a couple of blocks away from Jared and Ivanka, but the neighbors felt compelled to do something and felt their inaction was more detrimental.

“This is a first,” said Riley Temple, a retired lawyer.

“These were all Kalorama neighbors. Under normal circumstances we would never protest outside a home. But these are not normal circumstances.

“We shattered the custom because they have shattered civility,” he said.

He continued: “These separation polices, the inability to bring [migrant families separated at the border] back together are crimes against humanity. And we didn’t want our customary silence and customary respectful distance to be seen, in any way, as assent to these policies.”

Dozens of local residents participated and Jared Kushner was said to be home, while Ivanka left their home for a meeting.

Temple don’t tend to bother the couple when they are out and about in the neighborhood with their children or at the local park.

“People give them space,” Riley said.

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The neighborhood is said to be where many politicians and government officials reside. The Obamas even stayed there after they left the White House.

According to the Associated Press, a government lawyer said Monday at least 54 children under the age of 5 would be reunited with their parents by a court-ordered deadline, only about half the 100 or so children covered by the order. The Trump administration was working on final background checks for another five children ahead of Tuesday’s deadline.

On the Fourth of July, a Black woman Therese Patricia Okoumou from Staten Island rose up in resistance and scaled the Statute of Liberty to protest the Trump administration and its harsh immigration policies.