Rihanna is reportedly set to join forces with Colin Kaepernick for a music video, a move that comes after she nixed an opportunity to perform at the Super Bowl LIII halftime show. 

READ MORE: Kanye West donates $73,000 to Chicago Mayoral candidate Amara Enyia

Unidentified sources told Metro.co.uk that the singer and beauty mogul and the former San Francisco 49ers quarterback are psyched about teaming up in a meaningful way.

“Colin was overwhelmed when he found out Rihanna turned down the Super Bowl to stand with him in his protest against anti-black violence and injustices,” one source said. “He’d heard a little while before the rest of the world did and since then they’ve been speaking regularly and have decided to work on something related to social justice reform.”

Standing for Something

Rihanna was reportedly asked to give the halftime show performance at Super Bowl LIII, scheduled for Atlanta in 2019, but declined in support of Kaepernick.

“The NFL and CBS really wanted Rihanna to be next year’s performer in Atlanta,” another unnamed source told US Weekly. “They offered it to her, but she said no because of the kneeling controversy. She doesn’t agree with the NFL’s stance.”

Rihanna is also following in the footsteps of her mentor, Jay-Z, who also turned down an opportunity to perform at the Superbowl last year to stand with Kap.

READ MORE: VIDEO: R. Kelly victims share their painful stories in new docu-series trailer

Both stars are part of an apparent trend of performers who have decided to sidestep performing at the game, normally seen as an international stage watched by 103.4 million people last February.

Kaepernick, who recently became the new face of Nike in a controversial ad campaign that urged to “Believe in something, even if it means sacrificing everything,” has not played a single down in the NFL since the 2016 season. He remains an unsigned free agent.

After Rihanna’s rejection, the NFL offered the performance to pop-rock group Maroon 5, who accepted.

READ MORE: Colin Kaepernick’s Nike ads boost company fortunes to $6 Billion