After two University of Oklahoma students left the school in disgrace following a blackface viral video controversy, police are now on the lookout for a man who walked the campus with his face painted in the same offensive way.

University of Oklahoma students who wore blackface in video leave school in disgrace

“Ok so random dude @ The University of Oklahoma? he really feels bold enough to do this lmao what the HELL,” wrote Twitter user @_sosolee, along with video footage.

The reckless racist made students feel uneasy as he also sported an “anti-PC” shirt, reports The NY Post.

“We just don’t know how to stop doing blackface around The University of Oklahoma,” said another user.

On Wednesday, University officials issued an alert trying to calm students’ concerns saying they are “working to ensure all on campus are safe.”

“An individual has been observed walking on and near campus in blackface,” the school tweeted. “The individual has not been located by OUPD and we have no information on whether he is a student.”

The Black Student Association at the University took to social media to list “safe places” for students to gather and discuss the issue.

VIDEO: Students wear confederate flag gear and face-paint to celebrate racist heritage ‘We’re not going to take it off for anyone’

“BSA will be opening the HTCC at 7:30 p.m for all of those that need a safe place to process all the emotions of the recent events happening on OUR campus,” the organization said. “During this we will come together as a community to strategize and come up with a viable plan of solutions. #BetterTogether.”

Recently, two women, Frances Ford and Olivia Urban issued an apology for posting an “insensitive and irresponsible”, video mocking Black people, adding: “I am truly heartbroken over this mistake and deeply regret any adverse reactions,” Ford said.

In a Twitter video, which was shared on Friday (first shared on Snapchat), one woman is seen painting her face and hands black before looking into the camera and saying what sounds like “I am a n—r.”

The school swiftly condemned the video.

“We are saddened and offended that on the eve of such an important holiday for our nation we are reminded how far we have yet to come in the conversation about treating everyone with respect and dignity,” said Gallogly in a joint statement with DrJane Irungu, interim associate vice president of the Office of University Community. “Martin Luther King, Jr said: ‘The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. Intelligence plus character – that is the goal of true education’.”