Night King Game of Thrones thegrio.com
HBO

“The Long Night,” episode three of the final season of Game of Thrones (#DemThrones), was arguably one of our generation’s most anticipated single episodes of television. Based off of next-day reactions, the episode exceeded expectations. It probably also broke a more dubious record for most unencumbered social media spoilers because many of y’all ain’t shit.

(Like, many of you really ought to be ashamed of yourselves for your behavior.)

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Considering how beloved Game of Thrones is and how it collects new viewers with every season, the amount of fan engagement and memes that drop following every new Sunday episode would make Olivia Pope and James St. Patrick blush. Episodes like “The Long Night” are the reason that Twitter exists. Just make sure you stay the hell away from the internet – and the rest of this piece – if you haven’t already watched the episode.

Daenerys Targaryen has spent several seasons commanding armies and her dragons to kill bad people and anyone who stands against her. But in this episode, she found herself on the ground surrounded by wights and had to get her nice, white costume dirty. She even had to pick up a weapon and, well….

 

 

 

One of the worst ideas anyone had was to stash all the women and children in a crypt to “protect” them from the Battle of Winterfell. In a crypt. With all the dead people. Whom the Night King has proven to everyone that he can resurrect…

 

 

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Brienne of Tarth is my single favorite character on the show, so I was definitely concerned when it appeared that she and Jamie were being overrun by wights and wouldn’t make it to episode four. Alas, Ser Brianne lives to slay another day, and I don’t have to rage-quit the show so close to the end.

 

 

 

 

Arya Stark obviously had the episode’s most watercooler moment, coming from out of no-damn-where when all seemed lost to take out the Night King with the same dagger that was used in an attempt to take her brother Bran’s life in the show’s very first season.

 

 

 

 

It would appear that Brandon, despite being disabled and kinda weird, was always the key to taking out the Night King. He put all the chess pieces in play to set up the encounter between Arya and the Night King; eagle-eyed viewers realized that the whole damn thing was set up several seasons ago.

 

 

 

 

After a whole series of doing awful shit in the name of the Lord of Light, the Red Woman Melisandre finally fulfilled her destiny by giving the protagonists every leg up she could in an otherwise one-sided battle before walking off into the sunset to finally die.

 

 

 

Theon Greyjoy has the series’ most redemptive character arc: He was an mean, cowardly bastard we all wanted to see take an L in season two before getting broken down by Ramsay Bolton and eventually rebuilt. It made perfect sense that he die atoning for his sins – his last stand was among the episode’s most goosebump-inducing moments, even if it was extremely telegraphed.

 

 

Ser Jorah Mormont’s death following his unwavering devotion to protecting the Mother of Dragons is a reminder of how truly loyal he was. And how loyal a man can be while kicking it in the friend zone forever.

 

 

 

 

And clearly, the Crying Jordan meme is like taxes and herpes – it won’t ever go away. Night King, we hardly knew ye.

 

 

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Dustin J. Seibert is a native Detroiter living in Chicago. Miraculously, people have paid him to be aggressively light-skinned via a computer keyboard for nearly two decades. He loves his own mama slightly more than he loves music and exercises every day only so his French fry intake doesn’t catch up to him. Find him at his own site, wafflecolored.com.