5 biggest conservative excuses for Obama’s re-election

Karl Rove, former Deputy Chief of Staff to former U.S. President George W. Bush walks the floor before the start of the abbreviated first day of the Republican National Convention at the Tampa Bay Times Forum on August 27, 2012 in Tampa, Florida. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Karl Rove, former Deputy Chief of Staff to former U.S. President George W. Bush walks the floor before the start of the abbreviated first day of the Republican National Convention at the Tampa Bay Times Forum on August 27, 2012 in Tampa, Florida. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

“They want things. And who is going to give them things? President Obama. He knows it, and he ran on it,” O’Reilly added.

If by “stuff” and “things,” he means the health care, economic and civil rights concerns of the large number of African-American, Latino, and female voters who showed up at the polls, then it’s no wonder Romney didn’t secure the win he was looking for.

3. Romney Was Too Moderate

Huffington Post’s John Ziegler wrote the day before elections that if Romney were to lose it would be because of his performance in the third presidential debate. He claimed Romney stood down when he should have been more aggressive.

“Mitt Romney had President Obama on the ropes going into the third debate,” he wrote. “He could have knocked him out for good on the Benghazi fiasco but his people miscalculated and thought it wasn’t worth the risk because they already had enough momentum to carry them to the finish line.”

Since the elections, other conservatives have been echoing the same idea.

“What we got was a weak, moderate candidate, hand-picked by the Beltway elites and country-club establishment wing of the Republican party,” Jenny Beth Martin, head of the Tea Party Patriots, said. “The presidential loss is unequivocally on them.”

The Hill’s Erik Wasson wrote that conservatives believe Romney’s centrist, middle-of-the-road approach toward the end of the campaign cost him the presidency.

4. Democratic Voter Suppression

Karl Rove appeared on Fox News Thursday with the answer for Romney’s failed presidential bid: voter suppression.

According to Rove, President Obama won by “suppressing the vote” with negative campaign ads, which he said turned off voters.

Having had a chance to collect himself after his near meltdown election night on Fox News when Ohio was called for President Obama, Rove insisted that the president won by convincing people not to vote for Romney.

“He succeeded by suppressing the vote, by saying to people, ‘you may not like who I am and I know you can’t bring yourself to vote for me, but I’m going to paint this other guy as simply a rich guy who only cares about himself.’”

It seems Rove has confused campaigning with actual attempts to prevent voters from getting to the polls.

And he was also unable to provide further explanation for his claim, only saying that President Obama is the first president in history to win a second term with a smaller percentage of the vote.

5. Voters’ Ignorance

Republican Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson has also chimed in to share his opinion on where all the blame lies. Apparently, it’s in the hands of the voters.

In an interview with the Associated Press on Wednesday, Johnson said, “If you aren’t properly informed, if you don’t understand the problems facing this nation, you are that much more prone to falling prey to demagoguing solutions. And the problem with demagoguing solutions is they don’t work.”

“I am concerned about people who don’t fully understand the very ugly math we are facing in this  country,” he added.

But as Huffington Post’s Amanda Terkel points out, voters have had even more access to information this election year than any other in the past. This year, both parties outspent themselves to win voters to their side.

Follow Ugonna on Twitter at @ugonnaokpalaoka