Michelle Obama asked about running for office, says it takes ‘patience’

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First lady Michelle Obama speaks during an awards ceremony for the President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities in the East Room at the White House on November 19, 2012 in Washington, DC. The first lady talked about the importance of afterschool and out of school arts and humanities education and presented awards recognizing programs across the country that benefit underserved youth. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

First lady Michelle Obama speaks during an awards ceremony for the President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities in the East Room at the White House on November 19, 2012 in Washington, DC. The first lady talked about the importance of afterschool and out of school arts and humanities education and presented awards recognizing programs across the country that benefit underserved youth. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

First lady Michelle Obama’s potential future in politics has been subject to speculation as of late.

Despite vehemently denying any interest in running for office now or in the future, Democrats have still expressed a desire to see the popular wife of the president take the leap.

A recent Public Policy Polling survey suggested she would handily defeat Republican senator Mark Kirk if she were to run against him in Illinois.

“I’d love to see her get more into politics because it would be a breath of fresh air in D.C.,” South Carolina Democratic Rep. James Clyburn told Newsweek.

“She’s honest and straightforward, which is not what you see in Washington much. She is exactly what we need around here,” he added.

Actor Samuel L. Jackson, a major Obama supporter, has also endorsed a potential political future for the first lady

“Michelle is Superwoman. What can’t she do?” Jackson told Newsweek. “That’s why people love her. She can be on the Supreme Court and anywhere else she wants. She can be the president. She’s history and she’ll stay history because she is so amazingly smart and together.”

Barbara Walters broached the subject when she recently interviewed Mrs. Obama.

“I have learned from my husband, watching him, that it does require a great deal of patience to really feel the full impact of the work that you do on the ground,” Michelle Obama said. “It doesn’t happen right away.”

When asked about what she would change about herself if she could, again the first lady spoke about “patience.”

“I’d be more patient. I think I’ve gotten more patient over the years,” she said. “I’m constantly working on just being patient with myself and not letting my expectations get ahead of what’s happening now.”