theGrio’s 100: Dr. Charles Crutchfield III, leading ethnic skin care expert

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Dr. Charles Crutchfield, III

Dr. Charles Crutchfield III stands next to a photo of him as a young child with his parents at their graduation from the University of Minnesota Medical School in 1963.

Who is Dr. Charles Crutchfield III?

Dr. Charles Crutchfield, 52, is a practicing dermatologist, educator, inventor, entrepreneur and author in the St. Paul/Minneapolis area.

The son of Dr. Susan Crutchfield (the first African-American woman to graduate from the University of Minnesota Medical School) and Dr. Charles Crutchfield II (the first African-American man to practice as an obstetrician-gynecologist in the state of Minnesota) — doctoring runs in the family.

He earned undergraduate degrees in cell biology and biology, then obtained both a master’s degree and a medical degree from Mayo Medical School. He is now clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Minnesota Medical School, where he completed his own dermatology training nearly 15 years ago.

Why is he on theGrio’s 100?

Locally and nationally, Crutchfield is considered a leading skin care expert, with a specialty in ethnic skin conditions.

His solo practice, Crutchfield Dermatology, celebrates its 10th anniversary this year, currently caring for 50,000 patients. He also serves as team dermatologist to the Minnesota Twins, Minnesota Wild and Minnesota Vikings professional sports organizations.

Even still, his impact on the field of medicine goes beyond the many patients he sees one-on-one.

He mentors minority students in the University of Minnesota’s Future Doctors of America Program, where students learn the art of medicine by shadowing him during patient appointments. Lecturing nationwide, he also educates his colleagues as well.

In Crutchfield’s role as an inventor and researcher, he developed and holds a patent for a medicine he developed to treat inflammatory skin conditions. In addition, he has published over 100 dermatology articles and co-authored a textbook.

The married dad of three children – ages 6, 9 and 12 – is also an author. He co-wrote a children’s book on the importance of sun protection in “Little Charles Hits a Home Run!”

What’s next for Dr. Crutchfield?

His next health-related project is a dermatology textbook focused on treating skin of color.

He has also set his sights on two other projects: one, a national campaign to eliminate the ability to text and drive, and two, a project to commemorate the heroes of the Civil Rights Movement.

Follow Dr. Crutchfield on twitter at @dr_crutchfield.