5 things to know about Michael B. Jordan’s work ethic and family plans

The actor is looking like a whole snack.

Michael B. Jordan thegrio.com
Michael B. Jordan attends the LA Community Screening Of Warner Bros Pictures' "Just Mercy" at Cinemark Baldwin Hills on January 06, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images) ()

Michael B. Jordan is blessing the latest issue of Men’s Health and we’re still drooling over the photos of that killer-monger bod.

The actor opened up about several issues including his starring role in the upcoming flick, Fahrenheit 451 and how he’s prepping his picture perfect physique for Creed II. 

Here are 5 facts we picked up about #bae:

He’s living in the moment.

Now that Black Panther has become a worldwide success, doors are opening up left and right for Michael B. Jordan and he intends to take advantage of the momentum.

“This moment I’m going through right now, I’ve worked my whole life for it. I got here and things are really starting to move. Now all my wants and ideas, I feel like anything can happen. It’s crazy. Take a rest? I’m like, why I gotta rest now? I just got here. Can’t stop now!”

He’s hell bent on making change in Hollywood and beyond. 

Jordan’s selection of projects has a lot to do with what they mean to society and his outlook on our future is bright.

“Everyone feels connected. Some person somewhere with an opinion can go online, say what they want, and it’s in front of everybody. It’s easier for people to unite, stand behind one another. I think history repeats itself. There’s a constant conversation between the oppressed and the oppressor. No matter what your field is, whether it’s gender equality, the Time’s Up movement, or diversity casting, it’s always going to be a back-and-forth battle. But this time it does feel different. Sometimes you need to have the same conversation over and over until it sticks. Maybe this is the time it starts to stick.”

He wants to leave a legacy. 

This sexy star has no interest in being a flash in the pan when it comes to success. He insists he’s in it for the long haul and is already thinking about the examples he’s setting for his future family.

“Life is short, you know? You see cats who had their moment. Where are they now? Then you see cats people are still talking about today. God rest their souls—why are you still talking about them? Why are they still impacting the world today? I want to leave something behind. A blueprint. A work ethic. Something that my great-grandkids and their kids and their kids can see: This is where it started. Lineage. Intergenerational wealth. Things that are here forever. All that.”

He works hard for those muscles.

Michael B. Jordan is busy beefing up in the gym for his upcoming role on Creed II and he’s taking his rigorous workouts very seriously.

“Boxers sacrifice so much. They work so hard. The diet, the gym time, the roadwork, being away from their family, they sacrifice it all for this one night. Twelve rounds. Can you do it? Getting into the mentality of a boxer, fighting for something, I’ve got to be that. Michael—me, the actor—has to believe the character’s wants and desires. That has to feel great, that has to feel dangerous, you’ve got to believe that.”

His next role is a big deal. 

Jordan is gearing up for the release of Fahrenheit 451 this month and he’s well aware what an important story it is, but that didn’t stop him from hesitating about taking on the role.

“Bradbury’s a true visionary, and those guys predict life, you know? That book could’ve been written two weeks ago—the burning of books and erasing the past and only focusing on what the people in power dictate what your reality is. It’s eerily scary to what it is today,” he told Men’s Health.

“I wasn’t exactly sure if I wanted to play an authority figure due to the relationship between my community and the police. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to play that character. But once I got into the book, heard what [director] Ramin [Bahrani] envisioned, and understood what he wanted to say, then it was like, ‘I got it. I want to be a part of it.’ “