Cambridge police caught beating Harvard student on video thegrio.com

TheGrio has launched a special series called #BlackonBlue to examine the relationship between law enforcement and African-Americans. Our reporters and videographers will investigate police brutality and corruption while also exploring local and national efforts to improve policing in our communities. Join the conversation, or share your own story, using the hashtag #BlackonBlue.

A committee formed to examine the brutal arrest of a 21-year-old Black Harvard University  student beaten by Cambridge police, and review the school’s policing policies has stalled in its efforts, The Crimson reports.

Dallas police identify cop who killed unarmed black man after entering wrong apartment

Before leaving, former University President Drew G. Faust formed the committee and ordered the review in an effort to address community policing and campus-wide concerns following the violent arrest of  Selorm Ohene.

Faust said the recommendations should be done by the beginning of the fall semester, but the committee has missed that mark.

On Thursday, the committee said it needed more time to conduct further “focus groups” with students before offering suggestions to the new President Lawrence S. Bacow.

On Thursday, Katherine G. O’Dair, the College’s dean of students, emailed undergraduates to invite them to apply to serve on the focus groups to “ensure broad levels of student engagement,” The Crimson reports.

A mysterious killing revealed to be murder-for-hire plot

In April, Harvard University President Drew G. Faust has issued a statement about the arrest of a Black student by Cambridge police, calling for the community to reflect on the incident against “the backdrop of increasingly urgent questions about race and policing in the United States.”

The brutal beating of undergraduate student, Selorm Ohenewas viewed widely in a shocking seven-minute video went viral.

Cambridge police officers can be seen holding Ohene down and striking him repeatedly, according to the Boston Globe. Faust called the video “profoundly disturbing” in an email sent to university affiliates Monday.