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NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 19: Bette Midler attends New York Restoration Project's Spring Picnic and Sherman Creek Groundbreaking on June 19, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Rob Kim/Getty Images for New York Restoration Project)

Bette Midler and her quick clap backs slamming President Trump on a regular basis had earned her an invite to the cookout. But now? We need that invitation back, sis.

On Thursday Midler, 72, got the internet buzzing and was criticized widely after a controversial (and now deleted) tweet, “women, are the n-word of the world” got her in a world of trouble.

She continued: “Raped, beaten, enslaved, married off, worked like dumb animals; denied education and inheritance; enduring the pain and danger of childbirth and life IN SILENCE for THOUSANDS of years They are the most disrespected creatures on earth.”

Midler’s comments caused outrage online and when the star realized that her insensitive tweet took a wrong turn, she deleted it, but then still tried to defend her words in an also now-deleted tweet. “’Women are the…etc’ is a quote from Yoko Ono from 1972, which I never forgot,” she wrote. “It rang true then, and it rings true today, whether you like it or not. This is not about race, this is about the status of women; THEIR HISTORY.”

Midler deleted that tweet and offered up an apology. “The too brief investigation of allegations against Kavanaugh infuriated me. Angrily I tweeted w/o thinking my choice of words would be enraging to black women who doubly suffer, both by being women and by being black,” she wrote Thursday night. “I am an ally and stand with you; always have. And I apologize.”

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Invitation Revoked

But Black Twitter wasn’t having it.

“Full stop,” wrote Atlantic reporter and former ESPN analyst Jemele Hill.

“The too brief investigation of allegations against Kavanaugh infuriated me. Angrily I tweeted w/o thinking my choice of words would be enraging to black women who doubly suffer, both by being women and by being black,” she wrote Thursday night. “I am an ally and stand with you; always have. And I apologize.”

“Black women exist Bette,” wrote MTV Decoded host Franchesca Ramsey.

“To use this saying which has been deconstructed and deemed offensive to African-Americans in this country shows lack of knowledge on issues of race and concept of intersectionality. It also denies Black women agency. I would urge you to read Bell HooksJune Jordan,” wrote Rosa Clemente, a Green Party candidate during the 2008 election and the first Afro-Latina to run for vice president.

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