Uber
(Uber)

With more than one million people from all over the world expected to converge on Atlanta during the Super Bowl LIII weekend Feb. 3, local Uber drivers were given lessons on how to spot sex trafficking victims.

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According to reports, Atlanta is known as the No. 1 place in the country for sex trafficking.

The training, held at the Uber office with about 70 drivers, shed a light on how a big event like the Super Bowl can be a big draw for bad people.

“Whenever you have lots of people coming in with disposable income, you are going to have human trafficking,” said Deborah Richardson executive director of the International Human Trafficking Institute in an interview with Channel 2 News.

Richardson noted that spotting a victim can come in various forms like a suspicious demeanor or how they’re dressed.

“Trafficking victims are not often dressed appropriately for the season or the time of day,” she said.

Richardson noted people can call and report suspicious activity at 1-888-373-7888 or text 233733.

Sex trafficking is reportedly a $290 million a year business.

Gladys Knight set to sing national anthem at Super Bowl

The NFL is hoping you will jump on the midnight train to Georgia for Super Bowl LIII to see auntie Gladys Knight, who they tapped to sing the National Anthem Sunday, February 3.

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The seven-time Grammy award legend is already trying to shut down critics who don’t want to see her sing the anthem while Colin Kaepernick has been unable to play in the league due to his police brutality protests.

“I am proud to use my voice to unite and represent our country in my hometown of Atlanta,” said Knight. “The NFL recently announced their new social justice platform Inspire Change, and I am honored to be a part of its inaugural year.”

The seven-year social justice partnership with the Players Coalition — which reportedly kicks off with a new commercial airing this weekend that will run through the Super Bowl — has three main focus areas: Education and economic advancement, police and community relations and criminal justice reform.