(Photo: Mike Windle/Getty Images)

Actress Keke Palmer joined the #YouKnowMe hashtag of abortion stories by sharing her own experience just one week after Alabama passed a polarizing and restrictive ban on the procedure which levels a 99-year prison sentence for providers.

UNDER ATTACK: Alabama governor signs near-total abortion ban into law

Palmer wrote in a now deleted tweet that her own decision to terminate her pregnancy was a difficult choice based on where she was in her career and life at the time.

“I was worried about my career responsibilities and afraid that I could not exist as both a career woman and mother,” Palmer tweeted, according to the Los Angeles Times.

But Palmer soon appeared to feel that explaining her story on social media, using the #YouKnowMe hashtag launched by fellow actress Busy Phillips, didn’t allow for the context that she needed for the difficult topic so she deleted the tweet.

Still, the popular actress continued to call out the Alabama Republicans for implementing the most restrictive ban in the nation that only allows for an abortion is the mother’s life is in danger.

“I am disheartened about hearing the news in Alabama. I feel as if women rights laws are going backwards. Individual choice is being taken. I’m truly so confused at the world rn and the policies that follow. #YouKnowMe”

“Making individual choices is not a betrayal to your faith. Mainly, because God knows your heart and your journey. God never judges. I hate that it’s always a this vs that, instead of an “I understand YOUR PERSPECTIVE.”

Rihanna sounds off on Alabama politicians over strict abortion law

On Thursday Rihanna voiced her own outrage about the ban and tore into Alabama governor Kay Ivey who signed the ban into law.

“Take a look. These are the idiots making decisions for WOMEN in America,” the singer wrote on Instagram along with a picture of the legislators who voted for the stringent law that doesn’t even include exceptions for rape or incest.

“Governor Kay Ivey…SHAME ON YOU!!!!” Rihanna added.

The law still has an uphill battle and will be challenged in courts so there’s still hope.