michael b. jordan, ryan coogler, Ta-Nehisi Coates thegrio.com
Left to right: Director Ryan Coogler; actor Michael B. Jordan; writer Ta-Nehisi Coates. (Photo: Michael Buckner/Getty Images/Anna Webber/Getty Images)

After destroying the global boxoffice opening weekend with the release of Black Panther, Michael B. Jordan and Ryan Coogler will team up again for a new movie about education.

Tackling the 2009 Atlanta schools testing scandal, one of the most infamous school cheating scandals in the country, the movie titled, “Wrong Answer” will be directed by Coogler.

The script for Wrong Answer is being written by celebrated author Ta-Nehisi Coates.

Making history is clearly what this dynamic duo likes to do. This new film will be Michael B. Jordan and Ryan Coogler’s fourth project together after working on Black Panther, Fruitvale Station and Creed. And they’re not done. According to the Source, Jordan and Coolger plan joining forces once again to make a movie about Mansa Musa, a very influential African ruler and emperor of the Mali Empire during the fourteenth century.

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Behind the scandal

According to 11Alive.com, Wrong Answer is based on a New Yorker piece from Rachel Aviv of the same name, and focuses on the standardized test cheating scandal in the Atlanta Public Schools system.

Michael B. Jordan will star as a math teacher helped his students cheat on standardized tests in order to keep his school from shutting down during the “No Child Left Behind” era, according to Variety.

state investigation determined that 178 educators, including 38 principals, had participated in the cheating scandal. Ultimately, thirty-five educators were indicted, with twenty-one pleading guilty and 13 going to trial. Beverly Hall, the former superintendent who was indicted in the scandal, did not go to trial due to illness and died of breast cancer.

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Eight of the 10 teachers who were convicted of conspiring to inflate students’ standardized test scores received prison sentences of up to 7 years.