Eli Sabur thegrio.com
(Photo: WGCL)

Morehouse student, Eli Sabur wants to be the change, so he decided to campaign for Congressional candidate David Kim in Atlanta and was knocking on constituent’s doors when the police rolled up and put a stop to the canvassing, reports CBS 46.

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Sabur said someone called the police on him and another student who were just trying to help the candidate campaign in District 7. He posted a video of the incident which has gone viral.

Kim released this statement:

“When I repeatedly hear of incidents like this, it deeply saddens me that this has become a running commentary of my campaign.  I understand why every parent of a child of color must have “the talk” and worry about all our team members out in the field.”

Thankfully the situation didn’t escalate and Kim said he was glad to know that the officers were friendly.

Sabur said despite the minor setback, he won’t stop his efforts to help Kim win his congressional seat.

As of late, these types of incidents of calling police on black people seem to be on the rise and getting more attention.

The same situation happened to a Black state representative who had the police called on her while campaigning in in her own district in Clackamas County, Oregon.

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Janelle Bynum, a black state representative was running for re-election for her seat and decided she would hit the campaign trail and canvass door-to-door to meet her constituents.

Bynum was soon confronted by a deputy after a neighbor reported Bynum’s so-called “suspicious” door knocking activity, reports CNN.

Bynum took to Facebook to detail how her campaigning resulted in an unnecessary visit by the police.

“Live from the mean streets of Clackamas!!! Big shout out to Officer Campbell who responded professionally to someone who said that I was going door to door and spending a lot of time typing on my cell phone after each house—- aka canvassing and keeping account of what my community cares about! I asked to meet my constituent who thought I was suspicious, but she was on the road by then. The officer called her, we talked and she did apologize. #letsbebetterneighbors”

Can we stop calling the cops on black people already?