Federal judge hears arguments today fighting Georgia’s anti-abortion law

Michelle Wilson, Program Manager for Women Engaged, speaks out against Georgia's restrictive abortion bill and for reproductive justice at a press conference outside of the Georgia State Capitol following the signing of HB 481 in Atlanta, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Georgia Governor Brian Kemp signed the bill, surrounded by supporters and Georgia lawmakers, in his office Tuesday morning. (ALYSSA POINTER/ALYSSA.POINTER@AJC.COM)
Michelle Wilson, Program Manager for Women Engaged, speaks out against Georgia’s restrictive abortion bill and for reproductive justice at a press conference outside of the Georgia State Capitol following the signing of HB 481 in Atlanta, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Georgia Governor Brian Kemp signed the bill, surrounded by supporters and Georgia lawmakers, in his office Tuesday morning. (ALYSSA POINTER/ALYSSA.POINTER@AJC.COM)

The Georgia anti-abortion law debate lands in front of a federal judge for the first time today as opponents fight to get the law reversed before it takes effect in January.

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The American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia is leading the fight to block the law that was signed by Gov. Brian Kemp in May. They’ve asked U.S. District Judge Steve C. Jones to block the law from taking effect as they battle the case through the courts, The AJC reports.

Back in June, the ACLU filed a complaint saying that the restrictive abortion bill that bans abortions in the state after six weeks, violates a woman’s constitutional rights under Roe v. Wade which gives access to abortion up to 24 weeks.

ACLU reportedly represents several women’s groups including, SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective, Feminist Women’s Health Center, Planned Parenthood Southeast and others, according to the outlet.

Gov. Brian Kemp is represented by Georgia Attorney General Chris Carr, Department of Public Health Commissioner Kathleen Toomey, members of the Georgia Composite Medical Board and its executive director, the outlet reports.

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There’s been an outcry from Hollywood celebs who had blasted state lawmakers for passing the heartbeat bill.

Recently, filmmaker Spike Lee called for Hollywood production companies to leave Georgia over the law that would ban abortions. But Stacey Abrams who lost the bid for governor, and others have been encouraging people to “stay and fight” the law rather than taking business from the state.

The law will go into effect on Jan. 1, 2020, unless it’s derailed by legal challenges.