Tamir Rice’s mother and ACLU team up for booklet to teach kids how to interact with police

The publication is entitled The Tamir Rice Safety Handbook and available now online at ACLU website

Samaria Rice teamed up with the ACLU to create a safety booklet for kids in honor of her slain son. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

The American Civil Liberties Union and the mother of Tamir Rice, Samaria, have created and released a booklet in honor of the boy who was shot dead by Cleveland police five years ago.

The publication is called The Tamir Rice Safety Handbook and was created to guide children through police interactions. The booklet’s cover is red, Rice’s favorite color, and features a smiling image of the boy on the back with “In loving memory of Tamir Rice” written.

According to Cleveland.com, Rice’s name and likeness are featured on six pages that make up the handbook. Details inside assist children and teenagers on how to utilize their rights in possible scenarios ranging from questioning on the way home to police visiting your home.

READ MORE: Police union files appeal to get ex-cop who killed Tamir Rice his job back

The ACLU states being stopped by a police officer is a “stressful experience” and the Handbook provides details the way for youth to be able to control your own actions. “Even when you do everything right, things can still go wrong. These tips can help you protect yourself,” the website reads.

“Black children often have to be adults,” ACLU Campaigns Manager Melekte Melaku said. “They have to navigate these encounters and have this information on hand in a split second where they might be scared of what’s happen next.

“We want to make sure we’re giving kids the tools that they need, while acknowledging that it’s not fair that young people have to walk around and fear for their safety like they still do in Cleveland.”

READ MORE: Cop who killed Tamir Rice finds new job, but boy’s mom not staying silent about it

Samaria Rice brought the idea to the ACLU to create the guide as a part of their “Know Your Rights” initiative, in hopes to save future children from meeting the fate of her son.

“I told them to use colors for kids to be more welcoming, so they read it and make sure they read it with their parents,” Rice said to Cleveland.com.

WJW-Cleveland reports The Tamir Rice Foundation organized Art, Activism & the Legacy of Tamir Rice this past Wednesday night at the Cleveland Museum of Art. The guide with the ACLU was released at the event, which more than 100 people attended.

The guide is available now for download on the ACLU Website, with physical editions available for those who are able to visit the headquarters.

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