Nola Darling will be returning to the small screen.

Netflix has given “She’s Gotta Have It” the green light for a second season. The series, based on Spike Lee’s first film by the same name, was highly anticipated on its Thanksgiving debut. The adventures of a beautiful, sexually fluid, young Black woman in modern day (read: gentrifying) Brooklyn is a premise a lot of people can get behind.

Reviews from the target demographic (Black folks) online suggest that the series is in the ‘love it or hate it’ category of television.

For the ‘love it’ folks, there are three things that you can expect from every Spike Lee joint: great cinematography, the classic dolly shot, and the inevitable Spike Lee cameo. All of those things made it into the “She’s Gotta Have It” reboot, and everyone loves those features. It’s other aspects that naysayers don’t appreciate.

To that end, I have compiled a few suggestions that could unite viewers and tastemakers for season two. I’m about helping Black creatives get that long Netflix money.

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Swap out the song choices and ditch the album covers

She's Gotta Have It thegrio.com
(Photo via Netflix)

The music for SGTHI is great. Viewers 30-something and up would recognize pretty much every song, either because the songs were hits during their adolescence or they were old-school songs that their parents played back in the day when they were growing up. That said, why is a soundtrack of mostly 20+ year old music the backdrop for millennials in modern-day Brooklyn?

Many of the song choices were quite literal. For example, Nola Darling was working, so they cued up Maxwell’s “This Woman’s Work.” It would be better to use more contemporary music that speaks to the emotion and drive of that particular scene to move it forward in the narrative. Don’t give me word for word lyrics; give me the feeling.

And for fuck’s sake, please stop it with the album covers. Make that a great little find on the official Twitter page or the official Facebook page or whatever, but seriously—we do not need eight seconds of album covers every five minutes.

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