The juice is loose and could be starting Twitter beef in his first week on the social media platform.

OJ Simpson reportedly has threatened to cut a man behind a Twitter parody account that made fun of him and the nasty text exchange could land OJ back in jail for violating the terms of his parole, The Daily Mail reports.

But is it really him?

OJ Simpson joins Twitter and says he has a ‘little gettin’ even to do’

On Sunday, OJ’s Twitter account @TheRealOJ32 reportedly sent seven direct messages to the parody account @KillerOJSimpson, which makes fun of the former football star who was charged and acquitted in the brutal slaying of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman.

OJ reportedly first sent a demanding message to the parody account writing: “Delete this account or I will have my lawyer remove it for false misleading content I didn’t post.”

The man behind it refused to which OJ following up with a stronger demand: “Like I said, delete this ‘Parody’ account as you call it or face serious consequences by me. I’ll find your a** one way or another so don’t mess with me. I got nothing to lose. Grow up.”


The parody account played OJ and sent a thumbs-up emoji and a knife emoji, further agitating him.

Simpson then too sends a knife emoji reply back with the message: “You think I’m playing? Tired of all your bulls–t. I WILL FIND YOUR A** AND CUT YOU — Don’t believe me? Just watch and see b**h.”

OJ then reportedly send 16 more knife emojis followed by the message “You next.”

O.J. launched the Twitter account with a video post in which the former football star said he’s got a “little gettin’ even to do.”

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According to the New York Post, a spokeswoman for the Nevada Department of Public Safety said that Simpson was still on parole, and that the Division of Parole and Probation “takes threats or acts of violence against public safety very seriously and is looking into the alleged complaints.”

“If there is an alleged violation, an investigation will be conducted and appropriate actions will be taken by the Division and the Parole Board,” spokeswoman Kim Smith told the Post.

Under Nevada law, knowingly threatening to “cause bodily injury in the future to the person threatened” is outlawed as harassment, which is punishable as a misdemeanor for a first offense.