Looks like the Osundairo brothers, the two men at the center of the investigation into the alleged assault against Jussie Smollett, are back in Nigeria, but with a good cause in mind.

According to TMZ, Abimbola and Olabinjo Osundairo have returned to their home nation to offer free medical services to those in need.

READ MORE: Legal red tape continues with Jussie Smollett case, but he doesn’t intend to be around for it

In Lagos, Nigeria’s largest city, the former personal trainers have launched a free medical outreach program that offers resources to help members of their community be proactive about their healthcare. These services include necessities like: checking blood glucose levels, monitoring blood pressure, and calculating people’s body mass index. They even have licensed medical professionals on hand to prescribe medicines and treatments.

“If you’re in Lagos Nigeria, come and get a free checkup,” reads their announcement on social media. “Hypertension is the single most common risk factor for stroke, chronic kidney disease, and heart failure among adult Nigerians. There is need for increased public health awareness campaigns focused on prevention, early detection, and prompt treatment of hypertension.”

Hundreds of people reportedly showed up to take advantage of the program when it set up shop outside of a local business.

READ MORE: Brothers at the center of Jussie Smollett hate crime investigation speak out

The last time the health conscious siblings were in Africa, they were being accused of staging a fake attack against Smollett on a Chicago street. The men allege the Empire actor was a fitness client of theirs and asked them to take part in the hoax as a publicity stunt.

In April, they filed a case in Chicago federal court against the actor’s legal team, Mark Geragos and Tina Glandian, for defamation; claiming the attorneys lied to the media in an attempt to make it appear as if they were the masterminds of a real attack.

They suit also claimed that Smollett, “used his clout as a wealthy actor to influence [the brothers] who were in a subordinate relationship to him and were aspiring to ‘make it.'”